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Wide world of beer… because not all beers are created equal! Ale and Lager beer

WROTE BY Marco Zambelli ON 26 February 2014 ON NEWS

We’re actually on final brewing steps of our 2.0 version at Yourbeer, during these days… very exciting, new hops, new flavors and fragrances… we don’t want to reveal to much yet, but we are confident you’ll enjoy the new recipes, as much as we were delighted by the perfumes bursted by the bubbler during fermentation…

But before bringing you our new beers, we wanted to take a step back to the long tradition in brewing, and craft beer of course, due to the fact that, as the title we chose… not all beers are created equal! And as beer sommelier and experts know, beers are different depending on ingredients, recipes and brewing steps followed, having different colors, bitterness and depth of hop aroma, flavors and fragrances to the sense of smell and taste… And as it happens for wines, any kind of beer prefers some food matching better than others, and also special moments to be tasted, and suitable seasons…

Luppoli, malti, aromi, a ogni birra il suo genere

Luppoli, malti, aromi, a ogni birra il suo genere

But let’s go back to basics: the difference between two big families in beer, Ale Beer and Lager Beer. The difference belongs to the wort fermentation methods used during brewing process, called top-fermenting and bottom-fermenting because of the typical movement of the two different kind of yeasts employed during fermentation itself.

Ale beers are obtained using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast, which at the end of fermentation forms a foam at the top of the wort, while Lager beer is produced using Saccharomyces carlsbergensis yeast (named upon the Carlsberg lab where danish scientist Emil Christian Hansen firstly employed it), a kind of yeast forming a sort of jelly at the bottom.

Ale e Lager sono le due grandi famiglie di birra

Ale e Lager sono le due grandi famiglie di birra

A consideration on temperatures before leaving… Depending on the yeast-type and fermentation, the brewing process then requires different temperatures: Ale beers need higher temperatures, usually between 15 and 20°, and represent the oldest process. Saison beers are among these kind of beers.
Lager beers need lower fermenting temperatures, between 4 and 6°, using a more stable and repeatable process, representing the most common beers on the market, such as Pilsner beer style.